Because someone had to tell you

funkymbtifiction:

Harry Potter: Molly Weasley [ESFJ]

Fe: Molly is the perfect mother – she adopts Harry like a member of the family, and makes sure he has gifts under the tree at Christmas. She runs her household with attentiveness to the needs of her children, and even though there isn’t much money, ensures that everyone is provided for. She frets constantly that the people she loves aren’t safe, and does everything she can to make sure they are safe – even if that means smothering them, and forbidding them from involvement in Order business. Her biggest fear is losing the people she loves. Her drive for harmony makes her miserable when Percy isn’t speaking to any of them, and Arthur is upset about it.

Si: She is down to earth and practical, rather intolerant of her children’s fantastical ideas. Molly wants them to finish school and get proper jobs, not bust out of Hogwarts and start up their own business. She is about security and respecting social rules. Molly keeps things about her that offer her reassurance, and remind her of a comfy, happy home. Her focus is on the immediate and essential needs of her family.

Ne: Her imagination can sometimes get the best of her; Molly gets a lot of her ideas from external sources, be that rumors about Hermione written by Rita Skeeter or going to Lockhart’s books when dealing with common household pests. Her ability to grasp the big picture allows her involvement in the Order, and the continuing fight against Voldemort, but under stress, Molly starts to panic as she thinks about the million ways everything could go wrong.

Ti: Questioning things isn’t her strong point, but Molly makes evaluations according to her principles. She doesn’t often share her thought process, just her conclusions. And when there’s a problem, she kicks into high gear in figuring out a creative way of solving it.

onepageproductions:

Further Inspirations of the Interrobang, by Woody Leslie.

"It’s the On Beyond Zebra of punctuation.”
  -H.F. Henderson (author of Henderson’s Concise Illustrated English Dictionary)

published by One Page Productions
August 2014.
2.75” x 2.25”
24 Pages

centuriespast:

DELACROIX, EugèneThe Barque of Dante1822Oil on canvas, 189 x 246 cmMusée du Louvre, Paris

centuriespast:

DELACROIX, Eugène
The Barque of Dante
1822
Oil on canvas, 189 x 246 cm
Musée du Louvre, Paris

discardingimages:

Ezekiel’s Vision (Ezekiel 1:1-30) ‘Also out of the midst thereof came the likeness of four living creatures. And this was their appearance; they had the likeness of a man. […] As for the likeness of their faces, they four had the face of a man, and the face of a lion, on the right side: and they four had the face of an ox on the left side; they four also had the face of an eagle. Thus were their faces: and their wings were stretched upward; two wings of every one were joined one to another, and two covered their bodies.’Nicolaus de Lyra super Bibliam, Italy ca. 1402.
Manchester, John Rylands University Library, Latin MS 30, fol. 123v

discardingimages:

Ezekiel’s Vision 

(Ezekiel 1:1-30) ‘Also out of the midst thereof came the likeness of four living creatures. And this was their appearance; they had the likeness of a man. […] As for the likeness of their faces, they four had the face of a man, and the face of a lion, on the right side: and they four had the face of an ox on the left side; they four also had the face of an eagle. Thus were their faces: and their wings were stretched upward; two wings of every one were joined one to another, and two covered their bodies.’

Nicolaus de Lyra super Bibliam, Italy ca. 1402.

Manchester, John Rylands University Library, Latin MS 30, fol. 123v

I love her. And that’s the beginning and end of everything.

F. Scott Fitzgerald, Letter to a Friend, February 1920 (via literarylines)
coffeeanddonatus:

Grammar to die for (1705).
Nothing like a adding a little death and despair to help students learn their grammar. From Josué Rousseau’s Ensayo da Arte Grammatical Portugueza, & Franceza (Lisbon: Antonio Pedrozo Galram, 1705). Rousseau’s grammar included a number of charming (and disturbing) woodcuts that are entirely unrelated to the text.

coffeeanddonatus:

Grammar to die for (1705).

Nothing like a adding a little death and despair to help students learn their grammar. From Josué Rousseau’s Ensayo da Arte Grammatical Portugueza, & Franceza (Lisbon: Antonio Pedrozo Galram, 1705). Rousseau’s grammar included a number of charming (and disturbing) woodcuts that are entirely unrelated to the text.

giantsteppes:



I’m in a relationship‽



It occurs to me that I may have confused my grammar lover when I told him we were not friends.

giantsteppes:

I’m in a relationship‽

It occurs to me that I may have confused my grammar lover when I told him we were not friends.
discardingimages:

what does the fox say?Konrad Kyeser, Bellifortis, Germany 15th century.
Besançon, Bibliothèque municipale, ms. 1360, fol. 78v

discardingimages:

what does the fox say?

Konrad Kyeser, Bellifortis, Germany 15th century.

Besançon, Bibliothèque municipale, ms. 1360, fol. 78v

How amazing it is to find someone who wants to hear about all the things that go on in your head.

Hold Still by Nina LaCour (via literarylines)