Because someone had to tell you

discardingimages:

what does the fox say?Konrad Kyeser, Bellifortis, Germany 15th century.
Besançon, Bibliothèque municipale, ms. 1360, fol. 78v

discardingimages:

what does the fox say?

Konrad Kyeser, Bellifortis, Germany 15th century.

Besançon, Bibliothèque municipale, ms. 1360, fol. 78v

How amazing it is to find someone who wants to hear about all the things that go on in your head.

Hold Still by Nina LaCour (via literarylines)
anne-withan-e:

"I don’t want diamond sunbursts, or marble halls. I just want you."

anne-withan-e:

"I don’t want diamond sunbursts, or marble halls. I just want you."

I no longer believed in the idea of soul mates, or love at first sight. But I was beginning to believe that a very few times in your life, if you were lucky, you might meet someone who was exactly right for you. Not because he was perfect, or because you were, but because your combined flaws were arranged in a way that allowed two separate beings to hinge together.

 Lisa KleypasBlue-Eyed Devil (via feellng)
uncommon-typography:

interrobang*created from the glyphs inBecker Lightnewlyn.com

uncommon-typography:

interrobang*
created from the glyphs in
Becker Light
newlyn.com

You care so much you feel as though you will bleed to death with the pain of it.

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix by J.K. Rowling (via literarylines)

Early Modern Porn Wars (via OUPblog)

One day in 1668, the English diarist Samuel Pepys went shopping for a book to give his young French-speaking wife. He saw a book he thought she might enjoy, L’École des femmes or The School of Women, “but when I came to look into it, it is the most bawdy, lewd book that ever I saw,” he wrote, “so that I was ashamed of reading in it.” Not so ashamed, however, that he didn’t return to buy it for himself three weeks later — but “in plain binding…because I resolve, as soon as I have read it, to burn it, that it may not stand in the list of books, nor among them, to disgrace them if it should be found.” The next night he stole off to his room to read it, judging it to be “a lewd book, but what doth me no wrong to read for information sake (but it did hazer my prick para stand all the while, and una vez to decharger); and after I had done it, I burned it, that it might not be among my books to my shame.” Pepys’s coy detours into mock-Spanish or Franglais fail to conceal the orgasmic effect the lewd book had on him, and his is the earliest and most candid report we have of one reader’s bodily response to the reading of pornography. But what is “pornography”? What is its history? Was there even such a thing as “pornography” before the word was coined in the nineteenth century?

See more at: http://blog.oup.com/2014/08/early-modern-porn-wars/#sthash.HUGvF8Al.dpuf

essentialsublimeabsurd:

Illustration of Dante’s Inferno, Map of Whole Hell 
1587

essentialsublimeabsurd:

Illustration of Dante’s Inferno, Map of Whole Hell

1587

centuriespast:

ARCIMBOLDO, Giuseppe
Costume of the allegorical figure “Grammar”
1585
Pen, blue wash on white paper, 301 x 202 mm
Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence

centuriespast:

ARCIMBOLDO, Giuseppe

Costume of the allegorical figure “Grammar”

1585

Pen, blue wash on white paper, 301 x 202 mm

Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence