Because someone had to tell you

coffeeanddonatus:

Delicate Greek types woven into Priscian’s Latin grammar (1528).
Page from Prisciani Grammatici Caesariensis Libri Omnes (Cologne: Gottfried Hittorp, 1528), with annotations in Greek.

coffeeanddonatus:

Delicate Greek types woven into Priscian’s Latin grammar (1528).

Page from Prisciani Grammatici Caesariensis Libri Omnes (Cologne: Gottfried Hittorp, 1528), with annotations in Greek.

Thomas Cranmer wanted one book and one liturgical “use” for one country. He wanted English folk to be able to go into any church in England on any given day and experience the same worship service in the same words. For a long time this desire of Cranmer’s was indeed realized—and more, it was possible to go into what came to be known as “Anglican” churches all over the world and hear the same beautiful cadences, which was something I doubt Cranmer ever expected. He was making a prayer book for his country, and expected that Christian worship in other countries would develop in varying ways according to those places’ liturgical requirements.

And indeed this is what happened. Every Anglican province in the world eventually decided that it needed its own prayer book—and as time went by and the English language altered and took various forms in various places, Anglicans felt that they needed to update those books. I don’t think that any of this would have surprised or even disappointed Cranmer—but it is a little sad nonetheless, because there is for many of us satisfaction in saying the same words that our predecessors in the Christian faith said. Any nostalgia I feel for that old prayer book is closely related to the way many Catholics feel about the old Latin Mass, or many Christians throughout the English-speaking world feel about the King James Bible.

Cranmer himself would, I’m sure, understand this nostalgia. But he would probably urge us to get over it.

Alan Jacobs, in an interview with Christianity Today

nihtegale:

Bacchus, Roman god of wine and agriculture c. 1496-1498

nihtegale:

Bacchus, Roman god of wine and agriculture c. 1496-1498

tinsnip:

(via xkcd: Strunk and White)

(Source: giveme-design)

englishdeathbyinternet:

i ignore capitalization i forgo most punctuation i maim the spelling of innocent words i make poor excuses for bad behavior. BEACUSE I CARE.
(I am begging you, please, to stop caring.)

englishdeathbyinternet:

i ignore capitalization i forgo most punctuation i maim the spelling of innocent words i make poor excuses for bad behavior. BEACUSE I CARE.

(I am begging you, please, to stop caring.)

coffeeanddonatus:

An Edinburgh Latin grammar (1725).
Title page from volume I of the first two-volume edition of Thomas Ruddiman’s Grammaticae Latinae institutiones facili, atque ad puerorum captum accommodata, methodo perscriptae (Edinburgh: printed and sold by the author, 1725). Volume II was printed in 1731. A single-volume edition, also printed in 1725, was to become the standard for this popular Latin grammar, not the two-volume edition here.

coffeeanddonatus:

An Edinburgh Latin grammar (1725).

Title page from volume I of the first two-volume edition of Thomas Ruddiman’s Grammaticae Latinae institutiones facili, atque ad puerorum captum accommodata, methodo perscriptae (Edinburgh: printed and sold by the author, 1725). Volume II was printed in 1731. A single-volume edition, also printed in 1725, was to become the standard for this popular Latin grammar, not the two-volume edition here.

coffeeanddonatus:

An index directs to some remarkable passage before which it is placed (ca. 1799).
Excerpt from a manuscript on syntax ca. 1799, with a fun little manicule. See the title page here.

coffeeanddonatus:

An index directs to some remarkable passage before which it is placed (ca. 1799).

Excerpt from a manuscript on syntax ca. 1799, with a fun little manicule. See the title page here.

coffeeanddonatus:

William Lily’s Latin grammar (1754).
The seven liberal arts frame the title page of an 18th century edition of William Lily’s A short introduction of grammar compiled and set forth for the bringing up of all those that intend to attain to the knowledge of the Latin tongue (London: Printed by S. Buckley & T. Longman, 1754).

coffeeanddonatus:

William Lily’s Latin grammar (1754).

The seven liberal arts frame the title page of an 18th century edition of William Lily’s A short introduction of grammar compiled and set forth for the bringing up of all those that intend to attain to the knowledge of the Latin tongue (London: Printed by S. Buckley & T. Longman, 1754).