Because someone had to tell you

design-is-fine:

Herb Lubalin, type pages from UC & lc, 1978. A love of letters is the beginning of typographical wisdom. The complete magazine: Source

bwansen:

Found in a Junk Shop: Secrets of an Undiscovered Visionary Artist

His story is one shrouded in mystery, almost lost forever, intertwined with secret societies, hidden codes, otherworldly theories and seemingly impossible inventions before his time. Unseen for decades and salvaged by a junk dealer in the 1960s from a trash heap outside a house in Texas, his entire body of work would later go on to marvel the intellectual world. But during his lifetime, Charles Dellschau had only been known as the grouchy local butcher.

[…]

In 2009, Pete Navarro finally published his co-written The Secrets of Dellschau, revealing a lot of the script he had decoded from the books. Four books still remain in the Menil Collection, locked in a humidity-controlled room. Researchers continue to unearth new pieces of information through  surviving relatives.

[…]

(via Messy Nessy Chic)

(Source: intjblog)

artofthedarkages:

shatteryourleaves:

artofthedarkages:

“Dido and Aeneas in the Cave in the Roman Vergil”
A framed illumination on folio 180v of a Latin manuscript containing the works of Vergil depicting Aeneas and Dido ambiguously consummating their marriage in a cave while their escorts shield themselves from the rain.
Ink and tempera on vellum.
Made in the 5th century in Italy. Currently held at the Vatican Library.

One of 3 surviving illuminated manuscripts from the Western Roman Empire.

…There are a bit more illuminated manuscripts from the Western Roman Empire—like the Chronography of 354, various papyrus fragments from Egypt, and the Quedlinburg Itala—but it’s one of only three surviving illuminated Homeric epics (along with the Vatican Vergil and the Ambrosian Iliad) from Late Antiquity.

artofthedarkages:

shatteryourleaves:

artofthedarkages:

Dido and Aeneas in the Cave in the Roman Vergil

A framed illumination on folio 180v of a Latin manuscript containing the works of Vergil depicting Aeneas and Dido ambiguously consummating their marriage in a cave while their escorts shield themselves from the rain.

Ink and tempera on vellum.

Made in the 5th century in Italy. Currently held at the Vatican Library.

One of 3 surviving illuminated manuscripts from the Western Roman Empire.

…There are a bit more illuminated manuscripts from the Western Roman Empire—like the Chronography of 354, various papyrus fragments from Egypt, and the Quedlinburg Itala—but it’s one of only three surviving illuminated Homeric epics (along with the Vatican Vergil and the Ambrosian Iliad) from Late Antiquity.